Found an injured bird?

/Found an injured bird?
Found an injured bird? 2017-07-21T10:20:48+00:00

How to help an injured bird?

First, be sure the bird needs help.
Unless there is visible injury, a bird on the ground is not necessarily a sign that it needs your help.

Eagles and other raptors

It is common for an eagle to sit in one place for several hours. If an eagle or other raptor remains in one place, especially on the ground, for more than 24 hours AND does not fly away on approach or is obviously injured, contact a licensed wildlife rehabilitator or state and local conservation officers. see list below

The National Eagle Center participates in transporting injured raptors to licensed rehabilitators, but we do not offer rehabilitation or veterinary care here. If you are in the Wabasha area, or have questions about an injured raptor, feel free to contact us.

Do not attempt to feed the bird!

Young raptors need their parents or a qualified wildlife rehabilitator to feed them a very specific diet in order to survive. If you suspect the parents are no longer around, i.e. neither parent has visited the young in 24 hours, contact a local wildlife rehabilitator to get the young bird to the help it needs.

Baby Birds

Young birds, nestlings or fledglings of many species are often found on the ground. Birds that do not yet have feathers (nestlings) are not ready to fly. If you can see a nest nearby that the bird may have fallen out of, you can simply replace the nestling. Parent birds will not abandon a nestling, even after human contact. If you’re not sure where the nest is, you can move the baby bird to a shady spot off the ground to protect it from predators and the parents may continue to care for it.

Fledglings are young birds that have their first feathers and are just leaving the nest. These birds are just learning to fly and may spend considerable time on the ground. Usually they do not need help. Parents are often close by, watching and feeding the youngster. If you suspect the parents are no longer around, i.e. neither parent has visited the young in 24 hours, contact a local wildlife rehabilitator to get the young bird to the help it needs. see list below

Do not attempt to feed the bird!

Juvenile songbirds are fed by regurgitation by the parent – you don’t want to try that! Baby birds need their parents or a qualified wildlife rehabilitator to feed them a very specific diet in order to survive. If you suspect the parents are no longer around, i.e. neither parent has visited the young in 24 hours, contact a local wildlife rehabilitator to get the young bird to the help it needs.

Some wildlife rehabilitation contacts in Minnesota and Wisconsin are:

  • US Fish and Wildlife Service
  • State Departments of Natural Resources (DNR)
  • Local sheriff or law enforcement

See this link for Tips for handling injured raptors