Visit the National Eagle Center on June 17th and 18th and join with us as we celebrate Bald Eagle Days! This celebration commemorates the anniversary of the Bald Eagle’s removal from the Endangered Species List in 2007.

Fishing for Eagles Kickoff June 15/16

Fishing for Eagles returns in 2016! Every Wednesday and Thursday during summer, kids fish for FREE when they fish for eagles at the National Eagle Center! We’ve got the fishing poles, lifejackets, bait and a dock out front. Sign out the equipment and take your kids fishing right here! Learn more HERE.

Friday, June 17th

MN DNR Fisheries* will be presenting a fish survey demonstration at the public dock outside the National Eagle Center. Visitor will observe from the shore.

US Fish & Wildlife Service* Ranger Ed Legace will be giving FREE pontoon rides on the Mississippi River. Seating is limited – only 10 people per ride! Ride tickets available on first come, first serve basis. Reserve your ride ticket same-day at admissions.

Ride times are:

  • 10:30-11:15
  • 11:30-12:15
  • 1:30-2:15
  • 2:30-3:15
  • 3:30-4:15
  • 4:30-5:15

*These events are outdoors and subject to cancellation due to weather.

All Day The US National Park Service (Second Floor Classroom)  Sediment in the Mississippi River created rich flood plain soils and built the Mississippi River Delta. Amazing sedimentary rocks are exposed by the Mississippi River as it slices through the gorge in Minneapolis and St. Paul. Today’s soil is tomorrow’s sediment! But, can we have too much of a good thing? Hands-on investigation including turbidity tubes, clinometers, sediment jars, and fossils will help clear the murk.

All Day Wabasha County Soil and Water with Jennifer Wahls, AIS Coordinator for Wabasha Soil & Water Conservation District.

Who wants Rock Snot in their favorite trout fishing spot? Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) have worked their way into Minnesota’s aquatic resources. Not only do these invaders affect our lakes but also our rivers, streams and wetlands. Learn which invaders are present in the County, what to watch for and what you can do to help prevent the spread of AIS to our unique aquatic resources. There will be samples collected from the area, some preserved samples and pocket guides to help with identification or reporting.

All Day Kids Arts and Crafts – 1st floor by the kids table!

Saturday, June 18th

11:15am River Chat* will take place outside the National Eagle Center by the Chief Wapasha statue and fountain. This 30 minute educational program is free and open to the public and covers a range of topics concerning the Mississippi River, its habitat and wildlife.

*This events is outdoors and subject to cancellation due to weather.

All Day The US National Park Service (Second Floor Classroom)  Sediment in the Mississippi River created rich flood plain soils and built the Mississippi River Delta. Amazing sedimentary rocks are exposed by the Mississippi River as it slices through the gorge in Minneapolis and St. Paul. Today’s soil is tomorrow’s sediment! But, can we have too much of a good thing? Hands-on investigation including turbidity tubes, clinometers, sediment jars, and fossils will help clear the murk.

All Day Wabasha County Soil and Water with Jennifer Wahls, AIS Coordinator for Wabasha Soil & Water Conservation District.

Who wants Rock Snot in their favorite trout fishing spot? Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) have worked their way into Minnesota’s aquatic resources. Not only do these invaders affect our lakes but also our rivers, streams and wetlands. Learn which invaders are present in the County, what to watch for and what you can do to help prevent the spread of AIS to our unique aquatic resources. There will be samples collected from the area, some preserved samples and pocket guides to help with identification or reporting.

All Day Kids Arts and Crafts – 1st floor by the kids table!

The Background of Bald Eagle Days

In 2007 the bald eagle was finally removed from the Endangered Species list after more than 30 years. The announcement was made at a public ceremony in Washington DC on June 28, 2007. The de-listing became official in August of 2007.

The bald eagle first gained federal protection in 1940, under what later became the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act. the eagles was later given protection under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.

The bald eagle population fell into steep decline due to widespread use of the pesticide DDT. DDT accumulated in the aquatic food chain, and caused the eagles to lay thin and deformed eggshells. In 1963, there was just one nesting pair of bald eagles along the entire Upper Mississippi River Wildlife and Fish Refuge – a stretch of more than 260 miles of prime bald eagle habitat! When the bald eagle was included in the 1973 Endangered Species Act, there were just 417 nesting pairs across the lower 48 states.

After banning the use of DDT, the federal government listed the bald eagle under the newly created Endangered Species Act. The bald eagle was one of the original species protected by the Endangered Species Act. Increased habitat protection and breeding and release programs helped to bring this magnificent bird back from near extinction in the lower 48 states. Today bald eagle populations are once again healthy and even thriving all over the United States.

When the bald eagle was removed from the endangered species list in 2007, there were more than 11,000 nesting pairs in the continental US. In the state of Minnesota today there are more than 2,300 nesting pairs of bald eagles.